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The Art Bead Scene inspiration piece this month is Primavera by Sandro Botticelli. 

Primavera means spring, and this is a lovely representation. I appreciated that the blog post this month had a little video with some information about the piece. I’m really a “what it looks like” kind of gal rather than researching meaning, but it was quite interesting and answered a couple of questions. It is such a peaceful scene, but then there is that blue-grey figure that seems kind of menacing. I found that is Zephyr, god of wind. 

These are the three graces. I love the look and feel of their gossamer gowns. They immediately reminded me of some amazing vintage Japanese glass twist beads I recently got from Sondra’s Estate Beads Destash Depot. They are so lovely with a luminous quality and light AB-type coloring that shines from the white glass. These, in turn, reminded me of a Joan Miller bead with a wavy design and luminous quality of its own in the blue-grey of Zephyr. I remember describing it to my mother after I got it as the most beautiful bead I’d ever seen. Now I’ll admit I’ve said that more than once in my life, but still. I was excited to see the two beads together. 

When I saw them together, I knew they were a winning combination. My first thought was to introduce some version of an orange color, the pop color in the painting, into the design. But I decided it would be so much more elegant to keep to a quieter color scheme. I had semi-matte opaline rounds in mind as they go very well with the glass twists. In looking at my Czech glass, I chose some silvery  “mercury glass” rondelles, light blue faceted bicones and light green druks – the colors of the waves on the Joan Miller bead. I finished the piece off with a sterling clasp by Miss Fickle Media.

I hoard art beads pretty hard, including a nice stash of Joan Miller, and it’s always gratifying when I find what I think is the perfect project for one. I really love how this turned out and how it looks like the three graces dancing in a spring wind.

 

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